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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Vaping: The CMH Heart Team answers your questions

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has become a common alternative to smoking traditional tobacco.

FOR THE MEDIA

Contacts:

Tamera Heitz-Peek
417-328-7245
theitz@citizensmemorial.com

However, its long-term health effects are not yet fully known. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), teens using vaping devices dramatically increased last year; with high school seniors reporting use of vaping nicotine nearly doubling from 11 percent in 2017 to 20.9 percent in 2018.

“We show concern for teen’s vaping because, in the history of NIDA surveys, 2018 reported the largest one-year increase of any substance in history,” says board-certified cardiologist John F. Best, M.D., FACP, FACC, FSCAI in practice at CMH Heart Institute Clinic in Bolivar.

“1.3 million adolescents started to vape last year. The perception is that vaping is harmless because it doesn’t involve tobacco. However, the evidence is mounting that vaping can be harmful to the respiratory system, potentially contributing to long-term respiratory problems as observed with tobacco cigarettes,” Best says.

Here are some common questions about vaping and how it compares to smoking regular tobacco.

Q: How does vaping work?

A: Vaping refers to the use of electronic cigarettes, which are also known as a Juul, vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigarettes, mods or electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). E-cigarettes vary in shape and size, but they all contain a liquid that is heated until it turns into a vapor and then inhaled.

Q: Is vaping addictive?

A: Vapor from e-cigarettes usually contains nicotine, a highly addictive chemical. Studies have also shown that some e-liquids contain other cancer-causing chemicals and toxins, heavy metals, and other addictive compounds.

Q: What other health concerns are there?

A: Another major concern is the number of young people who use e-cigarettes. Multiple studies suggest that teenagers who smoke e-cigarettes are more likely to move on to tobacco or other drugs. This is because of the effect nicotine has on the brain's reward system. Nicotine is also dangerous for a teen's developing brain—it can cause problems with attention span and learning, and raise risks for mood disorders and long-term problems with impulse control.

Q: Is vaping healthier than traditional smoking?

A: Vaping is not good for your health. However, it is less harmful for you than smoking if used as a complete tobacco replacement. Because vaping can encourage the brain to become more easily addicted to other drugs, experts recommend that you don't start using e-cigarettes if you have never smoked before.

Q: Can vaping help you quit smoking regular cigarettes?      

A: There is currently no sufficient evidence that e-cigarettes help smokers quit. In fact, some studies have found that people who tried to use e-cigarettes as a quit aid were less likely to quit smoking than those who didn't. There are seven other smoking cessation methods approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can help smokers quit effectively and safely. CMH offers free smoking cessation classes and counseling sessions throughout the year. Using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool should be a conversation you have with your healthcare team.

“At CMH, we encourage families to talk about these things,” Best adds. “Help your kids understand the effects of vaping on their health, how it effects brain development and the potential for addiction.”

For more information about cardiovascular services at CMH, call the CMH Information Center at 417-328-6010 or www.citizensmemorial.com.

Cardiac Care at CMH

The CMH Heart Institute Clinic and CMH Cath Lab include two board-certified cardiologists, John F. Best, M.D., FACP, FACC, FSCAI, and Joseph Moore, M.D., FACC and nurse practitioners, Kyla Inman, NP-C and Jane Smith, NP-C. The physicians and cardiac team staff specialize in invasive/interventional cardiology, diagnostic angiography, coronary angioplasty and stenting, pacemaker implantation, echo cardiography, inferior vena cava filter placement, pericardiocentesis, electrical cardioversion, stress testing and more.

Cardiovascular services at CMH includes an accredited Level II STEMI program with 24/7 cardiology availability. STEMI, which stands for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, is a heart attack in which a blocked coronary artery prevents blood from getting to the heart muscle. CMH was honored with the Mission: Lifeline® STEMI Receiving Center Gold Quality Achievement Award and the Mission: Lifeline® NSTEMI Bronze Quality Achievement Award for demonstrating excellent patient outcomes and implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association for the treatment of patients who suffer heart attacks in 2017.

The CMH cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation program is nationally recognized and is designed to help heart and lung patients recover quickly from a heart-related surgery, a heart attack or diagnosis of heart or pulmonary disease. It is certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). The team of physicians, registered nurses, registered respiratory therapists, and dietitians work with patients, their families and their physicians to structure a lifestyle plan tailored to meet their specific needs.

The cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation program is in a state-of-the-art rehabilitation facility within the walls of the hospital, but is also easily accessible from outside. CMH offers recumbent and stationary ellipticals and bicycles, recumbent cross trainers, treadmills, rowing machines, weight stations, stationary hand cycles, and an indoor walking track.

January 25, 2019

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Infocenter 417-328-6010, or 1-888-328-6010

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1500 North Oakland, Bolivar, Missouri 65613

© 2019 Citizens Memorial Healthcare

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Vaping: The CMH Heart Team answers your questions

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, has become a common alternative to smoking traditional tobacco.

However, its long-term health effects are not yet fully known. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), teens using vaping devices dramatically increased last year; with high school seniors reporting use of vaping nicotine nearly doubling from 11 percent in 2017 to 20.9 percent in 2018.

“We show concern for teen’s vaping because, in the history of NIDA surveys, 2018 reported the largest one-year increase of any substance in history,” says board-certified cardiologist John F. Best, M.D., FACP, FACC, FSCAI in practice at CMH Heart Institute Clinic in Bolivar.

“1.3 million adolescents started to vape last year. The perception is that vaping is harmless because it doesn’t involve tobacco. However, the evidence is mounting that vaping can be harmful to the respiratory system, potentially contributing to long-term respiratory problems as observed with tobacco cigarettes,” Best says.

Here are some common questions about vaping and how it compares to smoking regular tobacco.

Q: How does vaping work?

A: Vaping refers to the use of electronic cigarettes, which are also known as a Juul, vaporizers, vape pens, e-cigarettes, mods or electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). E-cigarettes vary in shape and size, but they all contain a liquid that is heated until it turns into a vapor and then inhaled.

Q: Is vaping addictive?

A: Vapor from e-cigarettes usually contains nicotine, a highly addictive chemical. Studies have also shown that some e-liquids contain other cancer-causing chemicals and toxins, heavy metals, and other addictive compounds.

Q: What other health concerns are there?

A: Another major concern is the number of young people who use e-cigarettes. Multiple studies suggest that teenagers who smoke e-cigarettes are more likely to move on to tobacco or other drugs. This is because of the effect nicotine has on the brain's reward system. Nicotine is also dangerous for a teen's developing brain—it can cause problems with attention span and learning, and raise risks for mood disorders and long-term problems with impulse control.

Q: Is vaping healthier than traditional smoking?

A: Vaping is not good for your health. However, it is less harmful for you than smoking if used as a complete tobacco replacement. Because vaping can encourage the brain to become more easily addicted to other drugs, experts recommend that you don't start using e-cigarettes if you have never smoked before.

Q: Can vaping help you quit smoking regular cigarettes?      

A: There is currently no sufficient evidence that e-cigarettes help smokers quit. In fact, some studies have found that people who tried to use e-cigarettes as a quit aid were less likely to quit smoking than those who didn't. There are seven other smoking cessation methods approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that can help smokers quit effectively and safely. CMH offers free smoking cessation classes and counseling sessions throughout the year. Using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool should be a conversation you have with your healthcare team.

“At CMH, we encourage families to talk about these things,” Best adds. “Help your kids understand the effects of vaping on their health, how it effects brain development and the potential for addiction.”

For more information about cardiovascular services at CMH, call the CMH Information Center at 417-328-6010 or www.citizensmemorial.com.

Cardiac Care at CMH

The CMH Heart Institute Clinic and CMH Cath Lab include two board-certified cardiologists, John F. Best, M.D., FACP, FACC, FSCAI, and Joseph Moore, M.D., FACC and nurse practitioners, Kyla Inman, NP-C and Jane Smith, NP-C. The physicians and cardiac team staff specialize in invasive/interventional cardiology, diagnostic angiography, coronary angioplasty and stenting, pacemaker implantation, echo cardiography, inferior vena cava filter placement, pericardiocentesis, electrical cardioversion, stress testing and more.

Cardiovascular services at CMH includes an accredited Level II STEMI program with 24/7 cardiology availability. STEMI, which stands for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, is a heart attack in which a blocked coronary artery prevents blood from getting to the heart muscle. CMH was honored with the Mission: Lifeline® STEMI Receiving Center Gold Quality Achievement Award and the Mission: Lifeline® NSTEMI Bronze Quality Achievement Award for demonstrating excellent patient outcomes and implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association for the treatment of patients who suffer heart attacks in 2017.

The CMH cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation program is nationally recognized and is designed to help heart and lung patients recover quickly from a heart-related surgery, a heart attack or diagnosis of heart or pulmonary disease. It is certified by the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). The team of physicians, registered nurses, registered respiratory therapists, and dietitians work with patients, their families and their physicians to structure a lifestyle plan tailored to meet their specific needs.

The cardio-pulmonary rehabilitation program is in a state-of-the-art rehabilitation facility within the walls of the hospital, but is also easily accessible from outside. CMH offers recumbent and stationary ellipticals and bicycles, recumbent cross trainers, treadmills, rowing machines, weight stations, stationary hand cycles, and an indoor walking track.