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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CMH offers free smoking cessation classes starting Jan. 9

If you’ve tried to quit smoking on your own, you know how hard it can be, because nicotine is extremely addictive. 

FOR THE MEDIA

Contacts:

Tamera Heitz-Peek
417-328-7245
theitz@citizensmemorial.com

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, yet an estimated 40 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. As of 2014, 20 percent of smokers are between the ages of 25 to 44 and 18 percent are age 45 to 64.

 

“Tobacco smoke contains a deadly mix of more than 7,000 chemicals,” says Anne Bristow, RRT and smoking cessation facilitator at Citizens Memorial Hospital. “Seventy of those chemicals in tobacco cause cancer. You are never too old to stop smoking.”

 

Studies show you have a better chance of success if you have help. Citizens Memorial Hospital offers some suggestions for support:

 

  • Join a support group. Without some type of program, 95 percent of quitters fail, according to the Foundation for a Smokefree America.
  • Tell your family, friends and coworkers that you’re going to quit and want their support. Ask them not to smoke around you.
  • Talk to your health care provider or a smoking counselor.
  • Get individual, group or telephone counseling. The more counseling you have, the better your chances are of quitting.
  • Many people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good, so don’t beat yourself up if you start smoking again. Instead, turn the relapse into a rebound by learning from your mistake. Think about what happened right before you started smoking again, identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into, and make a new stop-smoking plan that eliminates them.

 

CMH offers free Smoking Cessation Classes. The next session begins Monday, Jan. 9 at 5 p.m. at CMH Ash Grove Healthcare Facility, 401 N. Medical and will be taught by Anne Bristow, RRT. Bristow has a master’s degree in counseling and education, over 40 years of experience as a respiratory therapist, 20 years of experience as a smoking cessation counselor at CMH, and is a certified American Lung Association smoking cessation counselor.

 

To register for the class, contact CMH Cardiopulmonary Rehab at 417-328-6574. The smoking cessation classes are held for six weeks. Advance registration is requested and space is limited.

December 12, 2016

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© 2017 Citizens Memorial Healthcare

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CMH offers free smoking cessation classes starting Jan. 9

If you’ve tried to quit smoking on your own, you know how hard it can be, because nicotine is extremely addictive. 

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, yet an estimated 40 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. As of 2014, 20 percent of smokers are between the ages of 25 to 44 and 18 percent are age 45 to 64.

 

“Tobacco smoke contains a deadly mix of more than 7,000 chemicals,” says Anne Bristow, RRT and smoking cessation facilitator at Citizens Memorial Hospital. “Seventy of those chemicals in tobacco cause cancer. You are never too old to stop smoking.”

 

Studies show you have a better chance of success if you have help. Citizens Memorial Hospital offers some suggestions for support:

 

  • Join a support group. Without some type of program, 95 percent of quitters fail, according to the Foundation for a Smokefree America.
  • Tell your family, friends and coworkers that you’re going to quit and want their support. Ask them not to smoke around you.
  • Talk to your health care provider or a smoking counselor.
  • Get individual, group or telephone counseling. The more counseling you have, the better your chances are of quitting.
  • Many people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good, so don’t beat yourself up if you start smoking again. Instead, turn the relapse into a rebound by learning from your mistake. Think about what happened right before you started smoking again, identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into, and make a new stop-smoking plan that eliminates them.

 

CMH offers free Smoking Cessation Classes. The next session begins Monday, Jan. 9 at 5 p.m. at CMH Ash Grove Healthcare Facility, 401 N. Medical and will be taught by Anne Bristow, RRT. Bristow has a master’s degree in counseling and education, over 40 years of experience as a respiratory therapist, 20 years of experience as a smoking cessation counselor at CMH, and is a certified American Lung Association smoking cessation counselor.

 

To register for the class, contact CMH Cardiopulmonary Rehab at 417-328-6574. The smoking cessation classes are held for six weeks. Advance registration is requested and space is limited.