CMH offers free smoking cessation program beginning March 10

Quit smoking!   Smoking is the most important preventable cause of premature death in the United States. Smokers have a higher risk of developing many chronic disorders, including atherosclerosis — the buildup of fatty substances in the arteries — which can lead to coronary heart disease, heart attack (myocardial infarction) and stroke.

Without some type of program, 95 percent of quitters fail, according to the Foundation for a Smokefree America. CMH offers Smoking Cessation Classes for free, sponsored by CMH Cardiac Rehab. The next class begins Monday, March 10 at 5 p.m.

What makes cigarettes so toxic and dangerous?

There are 4,000 chemical components found in cigarettes and at least 250 of them are harmful to human health, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Here are a few examples:

  • 1,3-Butadine is a chemical used to manufacture rubber. According to the CDC, “it may increase risk of cancer in the stomach, blood and lymphatic system.”
  • Acrolein is a gas linked to lung cancer. It inhibits DNA repair and can destroy the lining in the lungs that protects you from lung disease.
  • Arsenic is used to preserve wood. In humans, it can cause heart disease and cancer.
  • Benzene is used to manufacture other chemicals. It can cause cancer, particularly leukemia, in humans.
  • Cadmium is a metal used to make batteries. Cadmium can interfere with the repair of damaged DNA, as well as damage the kidneys and the lining of the arteries.
  • Chromium VI is used to make alloy metals, paint and dyes. It has been proven to be linked to lung cancer.
  • Formaldehyde is a chemical used to kill bacteria and preserve human and animal remains. It’s a known cause of cancer, one of the main substances linked to chronic lung disease and a very toxic ingredient in secondhand smoke.
  • Polonium-210 is a radioactive element inhaled directly into the airway. Some studies show that people who smoke a pack-and-a-half of cigarettes a day are receiving the same radiation they’d get from 300-plus X-rays per year!
  • Tar is solid, inhaled chemicals linked with an increased risk for cancer. It also leaves a sticky, brown residue on your lungs, teeth and fingernails.


CMH can help you quit and give you the support that you need!  To register for the classes and for more smoking cessation support, contact Anne Bristow, RRT, CMH Cardiac Rehab, at 417-328-6574. The smoking cessation classes are held for six Mondays at CMH Cardiac Rehab, 1500 N. Oakland, Bolivar. 

February 14, 2014

Missouri Quality AwardStage 7 Award RecipientSBJ Dynamic Dozen Award Recipient SBJ Economic Impact Award Recipient Most Wired Award RecipientHospital 417-326-6000
Infocenter 417-328-6010 or 1-888-328-6010
infocenter@citizensmemorial.com
1500 N. Oakland, Bolivar, Missouri 65613